What are the differences between Xen, KVM, OpenVZ.

If you are like many folks that have grown beyond thier normal shared hosting plan or are in need of a linux server with root access you are probably looking for a VPS(Virtual Private Server). There are many VPS offerings in the market place today. So you may be wondering “what are the differences between OpenVZ, Xen and KVM“?

There are three major types of virtualization being used by most hosting providers today. OpenVZ, Xen and KVM. We will run through the three virtualization technologies and the pluses and minuses of each.

OpenVZ otherwise known as Linux Containers, is just that, a container based virtualization hypervisor for Linux. You can only run linux operations systems in an OpenVZ VPS, and you cannot make any kernel level modifications inside the VPS. The VPS’s on the host rely on the hosts kernel. One advantage of this is that it doesn’t have the overhead a true hypervisor does.

The biggest disadvantage from a client perspective that you should be concerned about with OpenVZ is that it can easily be over-subscribed unlike the next two technologies. To put that in layman’s terms, hosting providers can and do host 20+ virtual machines on a system with 12 GB of ram. Each VPS has 1 GB of ram “assigned” to it. However, not all systems use 1 GB all the time, so the system “robs Peter to pay Paul” when a VPS does need all its memory. It will allow the VPS to access its assigned amount of ram. However if none is available due to other VPS’s using it, contention can get bad and things slow down.


Xen is a bare metal hypervisor, which makes it capable of running multiple instances of virtual machines on a single host. These hosts are not constrained to the kernel of the host and for that matter do not even have to run Linux in the VPS. Xen Virtualization is capable of hosting Windows and BSD operating systems as seamlessly as a Linux guest. Additionally Xen is a very light hypervisor with a small foot print. This leave the valuable resources you need where you need it, for the guest virtual machines.

Another great benefit from a consumer perspective is that Xen cannot be over-subscribed. Each guest’s resources are allocated all the time on the host node. No sharing memory and hoping some is there when you need it! Xen supports both Hardware Virtual Machine (HVM) and Paravirtualization (PV) in the hypervisor. We personally recommend Xen VPS‘s to our clients.


Linux KVM is a virtualization module for the linux kernel. KVM requires that the host node have Hardware Virtualization extensions. KVM In my opinion is the up and comer in the Virtualization world. It is back by Redhat and they have removed support for Xen by default on Enterprise Linux 6, in favor of KVM. That being said I still don’t think its ready for prime time.

It has a lot of features and is similar in certain ways to Xen, as in it supports Paravirtualization via the VirtIO framework. But it is a lot more complex than Xen’s minimalistic approach. The KVM is loaded as a module from the standard mainline linux kernel, vs Xen’s very small footprint. I am a firm believer of Keeping things simple. The more plugins and frameworks something needs to do what something else already does, it just doesn’t make good sense to move to it.

Closing
In Closing we feel that a Xen VPS is the platform you should seek out if you are a looking to upgrade from shared hosting or need a server on the internet. KVM is still to complex and OpenVZ…well, out of date.

BandwagonHost VPS Review -Cheap SSD VPS 256 MB RAM Only $2.99/m

BandwagonHost is self-managed SSD VPS hosting Provider, They are owned and operated by IT7 Networks Inc. IT7 has been in operation since 2004.They offer cheap SSD VPS ,which run on KiwiVM, a secure control panel developed in-house.

The location of the server where bandwagonhost.com is hosted was determined as: San Francisco, United States.BandwagonHOST’s new Florida location is online. All nodes at this location come with RAID-10 SSD storage.

Get started by visiting: https://bandwagonhost.com/

BandwagonHost Price and Packages

There are 6 packages provided by Bandwagonhost .For instance, The VPS 10 GB SSD RAID-10 Disk Space,256 MB RAM,500 GB Transfer is $2.99 USD Monthly.They accept Paypal, Credit Card and AliPay with 30-day money back guarantee.

Bandwagonhost can supply two type vps : kvm adn ovz
What are the differences between Xen, KVM, OpenVZ.

If You’re a VPS beginner, You Need to Read This
How to create a vps on bandwagonhost

KVM VPS

10G VPS

  • RAM: 512 MB
  • SSD: 10 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 1x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 500 GB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$2.99/month
  • Get it!
20G VPS

  • RAM: 1024 MB
  • SSD: 20 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 2x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 1 TB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$4.99/month
  • Get it!
40G VPS

  • RAM: 2 GB
  • SSD: 40 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 3x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 2 TB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$9.99/month
  • Get it!
80G VPS

  • RAM: 4 GB
  • SSD: 80 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 4x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 3 TB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$19.99/month
  • Get it!
160G VPS

  • RAM: 8 GB
  • SSD: 160 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 5x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 4 TB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$39.99/month
  • Get it!
320G VPS

  • RAM: 16 GB
  • SSD: 320 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 6x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 5 TB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$39.99/month
  • Get it!

OVZ VPS

10G VPS

  • RAM: 512 MB
  • SSD: 10 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 1x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 500 GB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$2.99/month
  • Get it!
20G VPS

  • RAM: 1024 MB
  • SSD: 20 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 2x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 1 TB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$4.99/month
  • Get it!
40G VPS

  • RAM: 2 GB
  • SSD: 40 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 3x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 2 TB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$9.99/month
  • Get it!
80G VPS

  • RAM: 4 GB
  • SSD: 80 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 4x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 3 TB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$19.99/month
  • Get it!
160G VPS

  • RAM: 8 GB
  • SSD: 160 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 5x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 4 TB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$39.99/month
  • Get it!
320G VPS

  • RAM: 16 GB
  • SSD: 320 GB RAID-10
  • CPU: 6x Intel Xeon
  • Transfer: 5 TB/mo
  • Link speed: 1 Gigabit
  • Multiple locations
  • Price:$39.99/month
  • Get it!

What are Coupon Codes?

Coupon codes are discount codes that you can use for online or in-store shopping. The offer codes can redeem the offers .These are actual online discount codes which can be used at the checkout.

 

How to change primary domain or adding secondary domain on google free apps

There are a few things that we must need to do , At first you You must need to have a Google free Apps , then login in . . .

step 1  :  Update your account to Free Trial 

Please upgrade your account to “30 days Free Trial” from the Billing tab of your Google Apps admin dashboard . Go to your Google Apps admin dashboard and then click on the Billing icon. Here you will find a link to upgrade for 30 Days Free Trial. Fill up the details and click on upgrade.

Step 2 : Add Secondary Domain  (not an Alias Domain)

Also after you add your secondary domain within your Google Apps account, Google will ask you to verify the domain ownership , Make sure all verification are done.

Step 3 :  Execute this Google Directory API request for Swapping Primary Domain

You have to visit Google Developer Console Customer Update SDK , by visiting https://developers.google.com/admin-sdk/directory/v1/reference/customers/update , scrolling down to the “Try It” section, and setting customerKey to my_customer, fields to customerDomain, and adding the field customerDomain to the request body, with the value of your secondary domain that you’d like to make your primary domain (no www).

Click the “Authorize & Execute” button. Google will ask you for a bunch of permission and make sure you allow every of them. It will show you an HTTP response header just below the “Authorize & Execute” button. If you see the response code as 200, then your primary domain has been swapped with the secondary domain.